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Posts Tagged ‘non recourse’

Troubled homeowners who have gone through a foreclosure or a short sale may have a lurking problem that could cause them problems years down the road. Even though you think you may have put a bad chapter in your life behind you, the lender can still come after you with a deficiency judgment.

A deficiency judgment is when the lender sues you for the difference between the loan amount and the amount they (the lender) realized when the house was sold. Whether it was through a short sale or sold as a bank owned property may not matter.

Yahoo finance published an article that illustrates the problem with several examples. In one, a borrower even signed a document at a short sale closing that gave the lender permission to come after him.

If you are in a short sale, make sure you get agreement (in writing) that the lender will not pursue a deficiency judgment against you. If you have lost a house through foreclosure, whether the lender can come after you will depend on the state the house was in.

If you are in a recourse state, the lender can pursue a deficiency judgment against you. Per The New Republic blog, the non recourse states are Alaska, Arizona, California, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Washington and Wisconsin. However, even iin these states, a lender may have recourse with second liens and refinanced loans. Regardless, consulting an attorney is needed for advice on your specific situation.

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